Saturday, July 21, 2012

A trip to the Book Barn & photography inquiries




I wish I had remembered to take pictures. These were the best I could find on google, and they really portray the shop the way it is. A great thanks goes out to the photographer.



Really though, how could you give a high price to her...




The camera in questions. Suggestions?

14 comments:

  1. What a fantastic bookstore. It's good to know that places like this still exist.

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    1. I was all excited when I found it, and searched out any and all other used book stores in the area in an attempt to match its greatness. Needless to say, no other lived up to my, now, high expectations.

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  2. Man, that bookstore is amazing! We like the ones with store cats as well. I grew up with the beasts and am totally allergic to them. We joke about cats scoring points with their union by running across the street to get close to me.

    Good luck with the 35mm project. I was going to provide a link to my favorite vintage gear site, but it appears to be down :( The Argus is in a class of camera known as a Rangefinder. Plug the term into Wikipedia. The brick should be a fine camera provided the aperture stops down correctly and the shutter will still work at the right speed. Considering they run around $5-10 at yard sales, it it is a cheap experiment. The lens probably isn't great,but it will have a vintage look. Just checked Flikr: there is an Argus group and one for every vintage camera you can think of!

    I personally like the handling of 35mm SLR cameras. Canon AE-1 and A-1 bodies are dirt cheap and usually come with a great 50mm prime lens as a cap. They usually need a fresh battery to get the meter working, but the shutter curtains do what they are supposed to. I shot many rolls with an A-1 before transitioning to digital. You would have a lot more control with an SLR.

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    1. I will experiment a bit with the Argus I just picked up, but will definitely keep these suggestions in mind if I intend to purchase a better camera.
      I was never a cat person until a few years ago, but now I can't get enough of them. I have had as many as three at a time, along with two dogs, but two of the cats didn't work out (one was raping the little cat (both males) and the little cat would only be friendly for two hours in the morning. The rest of the day, he would hiss and scratch at you if you even walked by. Leila now has a huge five or so inch scar on her arm from trying to pet him, and I had to get rid of him. Manny is now our sole cat, and he is a doll. I will have to post pictures of him at some point. Just...laying on his back, arms in the air...

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  3. Now that's a bookstore worth browsing in. I hope the owners will be able to sustain the business side of things and keep the bookstore thriving.

    I had a Soviet film camera for a while but gave it to my sister who's really into film photography.

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    1. They always seem to be busy, tell you the truth. The prices are a bit higher than Amazon would be, but I love the experience and adventure of the place. Hopefully that alone will keep them chugging along. They have been there for a long while.

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  4. Do you follow Joe Van Cleave's blog? http://joevancleave.blogspot.com/

    He often uses a homemade pinhole camera. Takes cool photos! Very atmospheric.

    Joe also might have suggestions that meet your criteria.

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    1. I may have checked it once or twice, but it does not ring many bells. I will check it in a moment!
      Leila was telling me about how they used to experiment with pinhole cameras made from old cans and stuff. Sounds like a lot of fun, and I am sure we will end up rigging one up.

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  5. What a wonderful book store! If I ever make a trip to PA I need to stop there.

    78s. Interesting. Play them with the proper sytlus or you may wind up ruining them.

    Best of everything with 35mm. I still shoot 35mm as well as medium and large format. The camera choice is what can you afford and do you only want to do B & W? Processing B & W is fun and can yeild great and dramatic photos. Color is very expensive and can be a P.I.A. Transparency is fine, but there is no more really good Kodak film. Fuji does not render colors life-like. As with most Japanese film Fuji over exaggerates colors. Agfa and Ilford are still around. Ilford chemistry and papers for B & W is very hard to beat.

    I'd go with a SLR rather than a rangefinder unless you find a good Kodak Retiina-III or Retiina-IIIa with all the lenses. These were made by Leica for Kodak after the war and are super range finders and the Schneider lenses are interchangeable if you have the focusing adapters too.

    Good choices besides the Canon A-1 & AE-1 (better too) are the Minolta XD-11, SRT-102 and SRT-202. The mercury batteries are no longer made for any of the cameras from the 60s and 70s, but a Zinc-air hearing aid battery can be adapted and has nearly the identical discharge curve as the old mercury batteries and this IS IMPORTANT as the battery is only used for metering. Alternative is a good hand held meter like a Gossen Luna-Pro SBC which uses modern batteries.

    Don't worry about anything automatic. It takes away from the creative process. It takes away control from the photographer. Selectable auto or manual is nice and selectable auto shutter or aperture and manual is nice, but not needed. 99% of what I shot and many photographers with whom I worked all used full manual for 90% or more of their shooting.

    Go to the Rokkor Files (http://www.rokkorfiles.com/) to learn about the Minolta cameras and lenses. Amazingly they made Lieca cameras and lenses too. I have been shooting with Minolta products ever since buying my first SRT-102 (my photography prof. actually bought it for me or talked me into it) It is still going strong after thousands of exposures as an amateur and pro photographer. I never owned a Leica, but stayed mainly with all mechanical cameras. The modern stuff will never last as long as the all mechanical cameras)

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    1. Such extensive information you have granted me! Thanks a bunch. If I plan on further delving into photography, these cameras will be at the top of my list.
      The wind up phonograph player we bought came with a box of needles, and I switched it out once we got home. It all sounds like that song 'We've Only Just Begun' from that movie 1408. Amazing.
      There are plenty of neat places to visit in PA, but the Book Barn is a must for any lover of the written word. Hours can be lost within their walls...

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  6. I haven't used it as much as I should -- I've kind of fallen away from photography lately, as developing options have been drying up -- but I blogged about my own "brick" some time back. They're neat cameras, low-tech, and dead-simple. Very appealing to the typospherian shutterbug!

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    1. And...I will be checking that right after I post this. Awesome. Dead-simple is a major plus at the moment, as I really know nothing of cameras and just want to fiddle with developing.

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  7. Ken, you strike again with your adventures!!!

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    1. Now I am going to be thinking of The Empire Strikes Back all night. Thanks!
      Was trying to come up with some clever Star Wars reference, but, for once, I am drawing a blank.

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